Reminders… and Many, Many Random Acts of Kindness

For most of this month, I’m concentrating on all things spooky. But during “A Look Back, a Look Ahead,” I wanted to concentrate on another part of autumn: Togetherness. We come together for Trick or Treat and parties; we come together for apple-picking and pumpkin carving; we come together to sip warm apple cider while huddled around an even warmer fire. I wrote a while ago about about the impact kindness can have, and between everyone being tired of the pandemic and the current political environment (gotta love election years, right?), I thought it would be nice to set aside one day a week to focus on acts of kindness.

A Kindness Memory

While making these posts this month, I’ve found that little acts of kindness happen all the time. They don’t always have a good story to accompany them, but they always leave us feeling a bit better about ourselves and the world we live in. So today, rather than telling a specific story, I thought I’d share some acts of kindness that I see nearly every day:

  • Letting someone with fewer groceries go ahead of you in line
  • Giving a stranger a genuine compliment
  • Being a listening ear to friends or strangers–especially seniors
  • Picking up litter you see on the street
  • Leaving a generous tip
  • Holding doors
  • Putting away shopping carts left in the parking lot
  • Looking on the bright side
  • Recycling

Kindness Challenge of the Day

Do something–anything on that list. Or, even better… come up with something new. Do something kind and surprising. Make someone’s day and, in doing so, remind others that we are so much more than the current situation. We are more than a pandemic. We are more that arguments and debates. We are, to use the often-quoted phrase, “the change we want to see in the world.” Let’s show everyone what that means, one act of kindness at a time.

It might be a lofty goal, maybe even a bit idealistic… but aren’t those the goals most worth reaching? I think so… and I hope you do, too. It’s been said over and over again this year that we’re all in this together. And that’s true… but it will be true next year, and the year after that. So let’s hold on together. Let’s keep each other strong.

Let’s be kind.

Lost in D.C. and a Random Act of Kindness

For most of this month, I’m concentrating on all things spooky. But during “A Look Back, a Look Ahead,” I wanted to concentrate on another part of autumn: Togetherness. We come together for Trick or Treat and parties; we come together for apple-picking and pumpkin carving; we come together to sip warm apple cider while huddled around an even warmer fire. I wrote a while ago about about the impact kindness can have, and between everyone being tired of the pandemic and the current political environment (gotta love election years, right?), I thought it would be nice to set aside one day a week to focus on acts of kindness.

A Kindness Memory

With the election coming up, I thought it would be nice to share something that happened in Washington, D.C. but HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH POLITICS. (Crazy, right?) This act of kindness was very simple: Four college students trying to find the White House got lost in downtown D.C. at night. After being stared down by a rather frightening bouncer outside a club and then finding our way to a rather desolate section of the city, we eventually made our way back among crowds. We looked clearly lost and out of place–Three fourths of us had flannel shirts, and the other one was me: At 4’11”, I’m not exactly intimidating and I tend to wear my emotions on my face. Most people walked on by, ready to get home for the evening. But one couple came to us. “Are you lost?” she asked. “We’re trying to find the White House,” we replied. She smiled and pointed us toward the right street and then gave us detailed directions on how to get there. We found our way, got a few good pictures of the President’s humble abode, and then made our way back to where we were staying. A night that could have been dangerous–or in the very least disappointing–was turned around by the helpful hand of a friendly stranger.

Kindness Challenge of the Day

Help someone who is lost: Whether that means literally providing directions, or just being a listening ear to someone who is feeling uncertain.

Dogs, Chickens, and a Random Act of Kindness

For most of this month, I’m concentrating on all things spooky. But during “A Look Back, a Look Ahead,” I wanted to concentrate on another part of autumn: Togetherness. We come together for Trick or Treat and parties; we come together for apple-picking and pumpkin carving; we come together to sip warm apple cider while huddled around an even warmer fire. I wrote a while ago about about the impact kindness can have, and between everyone being tired of the pandemic and the current political environment (gotta love election years, right?), I thought it would be nice to set aside one day a week to focus on acts of kindness.

A Kindness Memory

I’m going to preface this by saying that my family has the sweetest dog in the world. (Okay, so everyone thinks their dog is the best, but… ours is really super sweet.) When Lilly was a puppy and we’d all be giving her attention, she would crawl from one of us to the next–making sure all of us pet her–in what we used to call a “love circle.” She’s always been very loving and gentle, and today’s kindness memory is all about her. First, a bit of background: My dad raises chickens as a hobby. You’d think that would be a problem with a dog. (And usually, yes it is: We’ve lost many chickens to neighbors’ dogs who have run loose.) But not with Lilly. When chicks were newly hatched, she’d just wander over and look in on them–more like a curious toddler than a canine. But one day, Lilly went even beyond her usual sweetness: It was summertime, so we had her outside, getting some fresh air. An unexpected summer rain came, and we all rushed inside and Lilly, of course, ducked into her doghouse. A few of my dad’s chickens were outside pecking away, and most of them darted back into the henhouse. But one decided that Lilly’s dog house looked more comfortable. Most dogs would have either barked away the intruder (in the least) or had themselves a nice chicken lunch. Not Lilly… she scooted over and let the chicken keep her company during the quick rain.

Here’s a picture of Lilly all cuddle-snuggled in bed. (We couldn’t find her… turns out, she decided that my brother’s bed was more comfortable than hers.)

Kindness Challenge of the Day

Do something nice for someone who is your opposite. Maybe they don’t agree with your political views? Or they come from a different background? Doesn’t matter. We are all people, so do something today that connects rather than separates. If a dog and a chicken can share a dog house, then we can share a few friendly words with one another.

Mini Golf and a Random Act of Kindness

For most of this month, I’m concentrating on all things spooky. But during “A Look Back, a Look Ahead,” I wanted to concentrate on another part of autumn: Togetherness. We come together for Trick or Treat and parties; we come together for apple-picking and pumpkin carving; we come together to sip warm apple cider while huddled around an even warmer fire. I wrote a while ago about about the impact kindness can have, and between everyone being tired of the pandemic and the current political environment (gotta love election years, right?), I thought it would be nice to set aside one day a week to focus on acts of kindness.

A Kindness Memory

I’m dreaming of vacations again, so today’s Random Act of Kindness is from a trip to Gatlinburg. I was probably about middle school age, which would have put my brother in early elementary school. Now, one thing we always do in Gatlinburg is play as much mini golf as humanly possible. On this day, we’d decided to try out a new course–it was a part of a “fun complex” and themed with safari animals. (So, you know… pretty much as touristy and fun as you can get.) We had just finished a game (with my father, winning, of course), and were dropping off our putters when a man came up to us. “Are you going to be staying here for a while?” he asked. An odd question, but my dad was like, “Yeah, this is our first day of vacation.” “Great!” he said, and handed us tickets–LOTS OF TICKETS–for all the other attractions at the park. “This is our last day and we haven’t used these up. Have fun!” My dad offered to pay him for the tickets, but the man wouldn’t accept. He simply wanted to see another family have some fun. And boy, did we! Bumper boats, arcades, go-carts, and yes… even more mini golf!

Kindness Challenge of the Day

Give someone a happy surprise. It doesn’t have to be tickets to fun and adventure. It can be something as simple as an unexpected compliment.

British Punk and a Random Act of Kindness

For most of this month, I’m concentrating on all things spooky. But during “A Look Back, a Look Ahead,” I wanted to concentrate on another part of autumn: Togetherness. We come together for Trick or Treat and parties; we come together for apple-picking and pumpkin carving; we come together to sip warm apple cider while huddled around an even warmer fire. I wrote a while ago about about the impact kindness can have, and between everyone being tired of the pandemic and the current political environment (gotta love election years, right?), I thought it would be nice to set aside one day a week to focus on acts of kindness.

A Kindness Memory

Back when I was in high school, I was SUPER into classic rock. (I’ve been to the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame three times.) I was probably a sophomore when I discovered the British punk band The Clash–and what teenager doesn’t love a bit of rebellion? I still rock out every time I hear “London Calling.” This particular day, I was at the mall and decided to purchase The Clash’s Greatest Hits CD. (Yes… this is back when people still bought physical copies of music, rather than downloading everything.) I was old enough to know how sales tax worked, but for whatever reason, I just didn’t account for it. I can’t remember if I was in a hurry or if I just epically failed at math that day (the latter could very well be true). When I went to check out, I ended up being about a dollar short. There was a huge line behind me, and to not have enough money for this shy, introverted girl was devastating. I stumbled over my words and started to explain that I’d head outside and get the extra dollar from my dad. The clerk just shook her head, said, “It’s fine. Don’t worry,” and then proceeded to pay the balance herself. I was surprised and, yes, a little flustered. It wasn’t until years later that I finally let myself not feel embarrassed. The lady didn’t have to pay for the CD; she didn’t have to make sure that this clearly awkward teenage girl wasn’t thrust into the center of attention. But she did. And now, whenever I play that Clash CD I’m reminded of how we can all help others to feel better in situations that are out of our control. After all, 2020 has given us very, very little control over so much of our lives. But at least there is this: We can control how we treat each other. We can control those little moments of awkwardness and maybe make them a little easier for someone else.

Kindness Challenge of the Day

Give someone a hand in an awkward situation. It doesn’t even have to take a cent–sometimes, just a smile and saying, “I’ve been there, too” can go a long way.

Why I Don’t Believe in Bucket Lists

I like goals. (Maybe a little bit too much, if I’m honest….) But I’ve always been the type of person to make check-lists, charts, schedules, etc. I like knowing what I want to do and planning it out. Once it’s on paper, it becomes more of a reality–and with clear, timely steps, I know how to make that reality happen.

So you would think that I’d be a fan of bucket lists.

Actually… no. Not even a little bit.

If there is one certainty in life it is uncertainty–and if we didn’t know that before, we definitely know it after 2020. Creating a list of “must do’s before I die,” honestly seems a little bit like testing fate. And, while I definitely have several things I’d like to do (visiting Japan is at the very top), I’ve never sat down and made an actual list. Why? Well, not just because the future is promised to no one (and I don’t want Afterlife Sarah to feel bummed about an incomplete checklist), but also because I believe more in celebrating what has actually been, rather than what might be.

Goals and dreams are great, but have you ever taken a moment to look back on what you’ve already accomplished? On what you’ve experienced?

We live in a very fast society. Whether it’s instant updates on LITERALLY EVERYTHING through social media, or the demanding pressures of a job, we’re constantly looking toward the future. And I think that’s why bucket lists are so alluring: They tie directly into our need to “go, go, go.”

But rarely do we take the time to stop and think about our own pasts and relish the treasures found there. If we did, we might find ourselves smiling over fond memories, or even feeling a little bit of pride over what we’ve already accomplished. And that’s okay–we should feel good about our lives. It’s not egotistical or self-centered.

I suppose you could say I’m more of a fan of “Reverse Bucket Lists.” It’s difficult right now to make new memories and go on exciting adventures. This year, my plans to go to Nashville, Graceland, Gatlinburg, Mammoth Caves, Las Vegas, and the Arches National Park all… well, went kerplooey. (Remember what I said about uncertainty?)

Instead, I’ve been spending time going through pictures and scrapbooking. (Admittedly, I’ve also been doing some vicarious living by flipping through travel books.) I’ve gotten ideas for the future, but I’ve also had a lot of fun reliving the past.

I’ve thought back on the ocean lapping at my toes and the sand squishing between my feet. (A memory from just last year.) And I’ve revisited the satisfyingly cool relief of a pineapple Dole whip at Disney World. (Three years ago.) (Seriously–if you ever go to Disney World, try to Dole whip. It’s amazing.)

I’ve also looked back on some accomplishments: graduating from high school and college; graphic design awards I won back when I worked at the local paper; the first Library Comic Con I planned. Like a lot of people, I’m feeling at a bit of a deadend this year: There’s only so much we’re even capable of doing. However, remembering things I’ve done before inspired a bit of fire in me: A time will come when I can do cool things again.

In short, thinking of my own “Reverse Bucket List” helped me put a lot of the “2020 craziness” in perspective. Life hasn’t stopped. It’s just different right now.

So here’s my challenge today: Write a Reverse Bucket List. Take a moment to think back on what you’ve experienced, what you’ve already done during your time on earth. If you want to think ahead afterward and make some plans, go for it. The future might not be guaranteed, but it is still waiting. Carpe diem, my friend.

But don’t forget to also appreciate the other diems you’ve already carpe’ed.

Stay positive, everyone. Lots of love!

Let’s Celebrate (Or: What Ferris Wheels, Pizza, and Bubble Wrap Have in Common)

These past few weeks, my Saturday blogs have been very… topical. Very based in the reality of 2020. So today, I thought I’d do something that was just plain fun.

Earlier this week, I wrote about today being Batman Day. But it’s also another special holiday. It’s…. International Talk Like a Pirate Day!

(For the record, I kind of love that Talk Like a Pirate Day and Batman Day are both happening at the same time. I’d tell you to imagine a Pirate Batman, but DC already did that for us.)

Meme found on Pinterest.

So… argh, me mateys! Batten down the hatches! Shiver me timbers! Um…. Polly wants a cracker!

Okay… I think it’s safe to say I’d make a pretty lousy pirate. (I can’t even swim.)

But today got me thinking about weird holidays. Because there are a lot of them. (We librarians know this very well; we tend to utilize unusual observances for displays. Nothing says “Read Me” like countless Italian cookbooks in honor of Cheese Pizza Day–which was Sept. 5, if you were curious.)

So, why do we make up these strange, oddly specific holidays?

Well, I think the answer to that is simple. Why not? Why not take a day to appreciate bubble wrap (Jan. 27)? Or to set aside time to eat what you want (May 11)? Or to celebrate apple turnovers (July 5)?

We humans have a history of doing what we can simply because we can. It doesn’t matter if the world if flat; if man will never fly; or if reaching the moon is a farflung, sci-fi fantasy. We hear the naysayers, and we say… “Nay!” right back to them.

Odd holidays are certainly a bizarre way to continue this tradition, but who says that everything we do has to be monumental? In fact, isn’t another part of the human story all about finding joy in the simple? Importance in the everyday? After all, it’s each of those tiny, seemingly insignificant cogs that keep us all going. Ferris Wheels might not be ending any wars, but we’d sure have a lot fewer romantic moments without them. (Ferris Wheel Day is Feb. 14, by the way.) And while they might not decide any fates, cameras do help us remember who we are and how far we’ve come. (Give cameras some love on June 29.)

So yes, we have plenty of oddball holidays. But it’s not really surprising: We love to do the unexpected, and we love to celebrate. And in a year like 2020, maybe we need a little bit of random fun now more than ever.

So, me mateys… set sail for one of these other bizarre holidays, coming your way this month!

September 20: National Pepperoni Pizza Day

September 21: Miniature Golf Day

September 22: Elephant Appreciation Day

September 25: National Comic Book Day

September 26: International Rabbit Day

September 28: Ask a Stupid Question Day

What’s your favorite crazy holiday? Have you ever celebrated any of these? Tell me all about it in the comments?


Info from HolidayInsights.com. Check them out for more wacky holidays!

I Miss High-Fives (and 19 Other Things I’ll Appreciate Even More After 2020)

Last week, I made a list of the 20 things I discussed how “bogged down” 2020 can feel; so to lighten that feeling, I reminded myself of all the things I was still able to do. This week, I thought I would take some time to make a list of things that I miss, things that I realize now might have been taken for granted, and things that I will feel blessed to again have as a part of my life. (I’m also going to knock on a lot of wood; I’m not writing this list to jinx anything, I just wanted to take a moment to appreciate those things that maybe I didn’t appreciate enough prior to this year.)

Last week’s list helped to put life in perspective, but this week’s list is more like a reminder in optimism: If history has taught us anything, it’s that hard times don’t last. *knocking on even more wood* So let’s take a look at what isn’t a part of our lives right now and remember, when they come back, to appreciate them all the more.

20 Things We’ll Appreciate More

(20) Hanging out with friends. Skype has been a great tool and solid substitute, but it will be nice to actually be with people again. Bring on the movie marathons! The epic game nights!

(19) Hugs and high-fives. I’ve never realized before that my knee-jerk reaction for a job well-done is a high-five. And air high-fives just aren’t the same….

(18) Going out to eat.

This delectable dish came from Bubba Gump’s in Gatlinburg.

(17) Vacations and day trips.

St. Augustine, last year.

(16) Not thinking about germs 24/7. When was the last time I sanitized? Did I already wipe my phone down today? Should I do it again? I will not miss these incessant thoughts.

(15) Nerdy Camaraderie. This year, the Cincinnati Comic Expo was cancelled…. This massive event is a veritable “nerdvana” of fun that I’ve attended for the last several years. While I always have fun, I’ll relish it even more next year.

Cincy Comic Expo. Any other Blue Beetle fans out there?

(14) Theme Parks. *sigh* I miss roller coasters….

Universal Studios, last year. I was the only one brave enough to tackle this coaster! Now just going out takes a different kind of bravery.

(13) Trying on clothes rather than just guessing if they’ll fit.

(12) Going to the movies. There’s just something magical about being at a movie theater, especially if its with other fans. The last movie we saw before the pandemic was My Hero Academia: Two Heroes. Many moviegoers came dressed in costume. Everyone laughed at the same time, cheered at the same time. You just can’t get that sense of togetherness from streaming.

(11) Sending food to a friend who is sick or who has lost a loved one. This is a big tradition out here in the country. But, right now, with everyone worried about sharing germs, the best we can do are fast food gift cards or pre-made treats from the store–neither of which have as much love as your family’s famous homemade lasagna.

(10) Programming. As a librarian, I miss being able to do programs. In the past, my library has held “comic cons,” murder mystery parties, and has even featured live animals. We all miss seeing our patrons have fun!

(9) Flea markets. Buying things previously owned by someone else and touched by who-knows how many people before you purchase it? Yeah… that’s not a thing we’re doing right now. And that means countless treasures are being left undiscovered.

Found this “blast from the past” at a flea market last March. Obviously, this March was spent a little differently.

(8) Trying new things. Let’s face it… you can only be so adventurous at home.

A couple months before the quarantine, my husband and I tried a local Japanese restaurant. I’m eagerly awaiting the next adventure–culinary or otherwise.

(7) Being spontaneous. This goes hand-in-hand with the last one. But I miss waking up one day and doing something completely random. Last year, for instance, my family and I visited the Mothman Museum.

The Mothman Museum. A weird little treasure we have here in Ohio.

(6) Buying brands that you want–especially with toilet paper and paper towels–rather than just what’s available.

(5) Visiting family and friends in nursing homes and hospitals.

(4) Having a choice of hand sanitizer. I miss the scent of “tangerine dream”… though I’m getting used to “assault-your-nose alcohol.”

(3) Sporting events. I don’t even like sports, but I do miss seeing my dad and brother get excited about going to games.

(2) Any type of gathering. I already discussed the Comic Expo, but there are tons of other ways to get together and share in a sense of community: Festivals, fairs, graduations, weddings, Proms, birthday parties. Like everyone else, I miss these… a lot.

(1) Smiles. Masks are playing an important role right now, but I’ll be happy to see smiles again (and to smile back, too!)

The phrase “new normal,” has become prevalent, but remember this: Today is not normal. If you want to see normal, look back to the past or think ahead to the future.

Stay positive. Sending lots of love to everyone!

Is there something you’re looking forward to doing in the future? Share in the comments!

Some Lifeboats in the Sea (Or: How Coloring, Books, and Pokemon Have Helped Me Survive 2020)

This year has been filled with a lot of “can’ts,” hasn’t it? We can’t have the graduations we wanted; we can’t go on the vacations we planned; we can’t even go out to eat without feeling like we’re in a post-apocalyptic novel.

It’s easy to get bogged down in the limitations that simply are 2020. After a while, your comfortable home starts to feel like a prison, and living vicariously through books seems like a cruel joke.

I’ve been feeling that way a bit lately, so I’m sure other are, too. That’s why I decided to make a list of all the things I was able to do in 2020. As difficult as it may seem, there have been some some “cans” among all the “can’ts”–like lifeboats in the tumultuous sea of this year. Writing them down definitely helped me; if you’re feeling a little shackled, give it a try. You might find it helps you, too.

20 Things I Could Do in 2020

(20) Revisit a favorite video game from my childhood.

10 points to anyone who knows what video game this is! (And yes, I currently have the high score!)

(19) Try out a local bakery I’d never visited.

(18) Discover new animes (and actually have time to watch them!)

(17) Read more books in one year than I ever have. (I’m at 205 right now!)

My first batch of books from the library during the pandemic. My husband took care of things like food… but I had the necessities covered!

(16) Organize my dining room, office, and “nerdvana” (a room where I keep my nerdiest collectibles).

(15) Start a blog! 😉

(14) Have time to really, REALLY write!

(13) Go on a really long hike. (With hopefully more to come!)

This tree might seem like it goes on forever, but this pandemic won’t.

(12) Bake! (Including…Bat-cookies!)

Holy sugar, Batman!

(11) Find some zen with coloring.

I sadly did not win the librarian coloring contest… but I still had a lot of fun with these flowers!

(10) Spend time outside: Whether it’s a walk in the country or some time spent on my front porch, sunshine and fresh are just beyond the door.

I loved taking these photos in the spring. Now I’m ready for fall colors!

(9) One word: Games. You don’t have to leave the house to be competitive.

My personal favorite… DC Deck Builders. (And yes… I did happen to win this game.)

(8) Evening walks around town (which also means… Pokemon hunting!)

Still trying to hit level 38. Only about a million points to go….

(7) Crafts! My 2019 vacation scrapbook is coming along nicely.

(6) Phone calls! Even if you can’t see someone, you can time travel to the ’90s when people actually spent time talking on the phone, rather than just texting.

(5) Learn a language! I’ve been trying to learn Japanese (which I’m finding out very quickly is NOT EASY!), and brushing up on the Spanish I learned in high school. Gotta keep that brain flexible, right?

(4) Quality time. My husband and I have busy schedules, but we’ve been able to spend more time together–never underestimate the power of just relaxing with someone you love.

(3) Stargazing–a nice reminder that the world will keep turning is to just look up and see the universe around us.

Maybe technically “moon-gazing” but the sky was beautiful that night.

(2) Laughing. Whether it’s a funny book or just being goofy, laughter is only a grin… a smile… a chuckle… away.

(1) Taking it one day at a time. Sometimes, that’s all you can do. You wake up and decide what this one set of 24-hours will bring: Reading? Nature? Being with loved ones? Learning something new? It’s a crazy year, but we still have one very powerful tool: Perspective.

Remember: Perspective is both a wonderful and dangerous thing. It can make the world around you a million times better, or even a million times worse. Even 2020, when so much seems far beyond us, perspective is something we can use to assert a little control in our lives.

If we stay positive and keep supporting one another, we’ll come out on the other side. We’ve got this!

What are some things you’ve been able to do? Leave your thoughts in the comments!

How Will We Live Through It?

2020 has certainly been a year for the history books, hasn’t it? I keep thinking ahead to the future, wondering how the year will look with the advantage of hindsight. How will this year ultimately be remembered?

And what I keep coming back to, unfortunately, is one word: Turmoil. 2020 has been a year of turmoil. And I’m not just talking about the pandemic or riots or upcoming election. It’s easy to point at the headlines and claim that those will be our only legacies. The truth–as unbelievable as it may seem–is that we most remember the people and moments that aren’t front page news. Those “everyday” stories are the ones that stay with us because, put simply, they are our stories.

We are most intrigued by the ordinary people who endured momentous times. We ask ourselves: How did they manage to live through the Civil War? The World Wars? The Great Depression?

Because those people, the ones just managing to live through it, are the ones who ultimately keep the human story moving forward.

Barbara Kingsolver described this simple fact best in The Poisonwood Bible. (She is primarily describing women, but the sentiment can apply to the “every-person” as well. ) Kingsolver writes:

“I only know the middle ground where we live our lives. We whistle while Rome burns, or we scrub the floor, depending. Don’t dare presume there’s shame in the lot of a woman who carries on.”

So, here we are in 2020. Here we are living our lives and just getting through it all. And how are we doing it?

With arguments. With violence. With disrespect.

At least, these seem to be the most prevalent. I hope that they’re not; just simply the loudest.

Not long ago, my husband and I were sitting on the front porch and he wanted to play me a Jimmy Buffet song he’d come across. We were listening to it, enjoying the type of relaxation that can only come from good ole Mr. Buffet, when a particularly loud car revved its engine right down our street. For a moment, that was all we could hear. The music was still playing, but it was lost to the noise. But then, the car drove away, and Jimmy was back:

“And there’s that one particular harbour,
Sheltered from the wind,
Where the children play on the shore each day
And all are safe within.”
*

I think kindness is a lot like that moment on the porch. Right now, everything else–the arguing, the rudeness, the dissent–is just louder.

And it comes from all sides, from every viewpoint on every opinion imaginable. Five minutes on Facebook is all it takes to feel knotted up inside.

We all have opinions. And we all have the right to express those opinion, especially when they concern our health and safety. We even have the right to be unkind. There’s no law that says we have to be nice to one another.

That’s something that can’t be legislated, and it shouldn’t be: Because kindness should be a game we’re all willing to play, no questions asked.

So today, I’m issuing a challenge: Do something kind for someone else. Take a moment of your time to keep the world spinning in a positive way. If enough of us do it, then maybe kindness won’t be so overwhelmed by the noise anymore. Sure, there will be discourse. Sure, there will anger. And sometimes, those options are the right ones. Sometimes, enough is just enough.

But is that true in the everyday, simple conversations we have? To the everyday, “middle ground” people who are just doing the best that they can in an often scary situation?

I suppose that’s ultimately up to you. Nobody can make someone else be kind.

But imagine, for a moment, what 2020 would be like if kindness had spread as far as COVID-19.

This will be a year for the history books. And one day, people will look back and wonder: How did they live through it?

Well… how did we? The answer is up to us.


*From “One Particular Harbor”